Typescript Operators

Typescript operators perform some operation on one or more operands and produce a result. The operand is the data or value on which an operation is to be done. For Example, in the expression 10+2 + is an operator, while 10 & 2 are the operands.

Typescript Operators

The Operators perform an operation on operands. There can be one, two, or three operands. The operators that require only one operand are unary operators. Those who take two operands are binary operators. The Typescript also have one ternary operator, which takes three operand

Binary Operators

A binary operator has one operand (Left operand) before the operator and one after the operator (right operand)

Unary Operatos

The unary operator operates on a single operand. The operand can be either before or after the operator.

The ternary operator

The Typescript also has one special ternary conditional operator, which takes three operands.

List of Typescript Operators

The Typescript operators can be classified broadly based on their functions as follows.

Arithmetic operators

The arithmetic operators take numerical values as operands, operates on them and return the result as a single numerical value.

Arithmetic
Operator
Description & Examples
+
Addition operator
adds two numeric operands and produces the result. If the operands are string, then it performs string concatenation.

Example:

let a=10;
let b=20
let sum = a+b;
console.log(sum) //30;

Example: string concatenation

let a ="Hello"
let b = "World"
let c = a+ " "+b
console.log(c) //"Hello World"
-
Subtraction operator.
Subtracts the two operands, producing their difference.

Example:

let a=20;
let b=10
console.log(a-b) //10;
/
Division operator.
The division operator numerator by the denominator. The left operand is the numerator and the right operand is the denominator.

Example:

let a=20;
let b=10
console.log(a/b) //2;
*
Multiplication operator.
The multiplication operator (*) produces the product of the operands.

Example:

let a=20;
let b=10
console.log(a*b) //200;
%
Remainder operator..
The remainder operator or modulus operator performs the division and returns the remainder

Example

let a = 27;
let b = 5;
console.log(a % b); // 2
**
Exponentiation operator.
The exponentiation operator (**) returns the result of raising the first operand to the power of the second operand.

Example:

let a = 2**5;
console.log(a); //32
++
increment operator
This is the increment operator that increases the value by 1

Example:

let a = 10;
a++;
console.log(a); //11
++a;
console.log(a); //12
--
decrement operator
This is the decrement operator that decreases the value by 1

Example:

let a = 10;
a--;
console.log(a); //9
--a;
console.log(a); //10
+
Unary Plus
The unary plus operator (+) precedes its operand and converts it into a number.

Example

let y = "1";
console.log(typeof(y)); //string
console.log(typeof(+y)); //number
console.log(+y); //1
-
Unary Minus
The unary plus operator (-) precedes its operand and converts it into a number.

Example

let y = "1";
console.log(typeof(y)); //string
console.log(typeof(+y)); //number
console.log(-y); //-1

Logical operators

OperatorDescription
&&
Logical AND
Logical AND for a set of operands is true if and only if all of its operands are true. It returns the first falsy operand. If all the operands are true, then it returns the last operand.

Example:

let a=10
let b=15
console.log(a > 5 && b > 5) //true
||
Logical OR
Logical OR for a set of operands is true if and only if one of the operands convert to true (truthy). It returns the first truthy operand

Example:

let a=10
let b=15
console.log(a > 5 || b > 5) //true
!
Logical NOT
The Logical NOT operator takes only one Operand and converts it to a boolean. Then it produces true, if the operand evaluates to false, and false if the operand evaluates to true

Example:
alert( !true ); // false

Relational operators

OperatorDescription
==
Loose Equality Operator
It checks whether the values of the two operands are equal or not. If the operands are of different types, then it does a type conversion before comparing

Example:

let a = 10;
let b = 10;
let c = "10";
console.log(a==b); //true
console.log(a==c); //true
===
Strict Equality Operator
It checks whether the type and values of the two operands are equal or not.

Example:

let a = 10;
let b = 10;
let c = "10";
console.log(a===b); //true
console.log(a===c); //false
!=
Not equal to
It checks whether the values of the two operands are equal or not. Typescript does a type conversion if the types are not the same

Example:

let x=10
let y=10
console.log(x!=y) //false

let a=10
let b="10"
console.log(a!=b) //false
!==
Strict Not equal to
It checks whether the type and values of the two operands are equal or not.

Example:

let x=10
let y=10
console.log(x!==y) //false

let a=10
let b="10"
console.log(a!==b) //true becuase types are different
>
Greater than
It checks whether the value of the left operands is greater than the value of the right operand or not.

Example

let a = 5;
let b = 2;
console.log(a > b); //true
console.log(a > 4); //true
console.log(a > 5); //false
console.log(a > 6); //false
>=
Greater than or equal
It checks whether the value of the left operands is greater than or equal to the value of the right operand or not.

Example:

let a = 5;
let b = 2;
console.log(a >= b); //true
console.log(a >= 4); //true
console.log(a >= 5); //true
console.log(a >= 6); //false
<
Less than
It checks whether the value of the left operands is less than the value of the right operand or not.

Example:

let a = 5;
let b = 2;
console.log(a < b); //false
console.log(a < 4); //false
console.log(a < 5); //false
console.log(a < 6); //true
<=
Less than or equal
It checks whether the value of the left operands is less than or equal to the value of the right operand or not.

Example:

let a = 5;
let b = 2;
console.log(a <= b); //false
console.log(a <= 4); //false
console.log(a <= 5); //true
console.log(a <= 6); //true

Bitwise operators

OperatorDescription
&
Bitwise AND
The Bitwise AND operator accept two operands. It compares each binary digit of the left operand with the digit at the corresponding position in the right operand. If both the bits are 1, then it returns 1, else returns 0. The following table shows how the digits are compared

Example

console.log(9 & 7) //1

00000000000000000000000000001001 =9
00000000000000000000000000000111 =7
-----------------------------------------------
00000000000000000000000000000001 =1
------------------------------------------------
|
Bitwise OR
The Bitwise OR operator accepts two operands. It compares each binary digit of the left operand with the digit at the corresponding position in the right operand. If both the bits are 0, then it returns 0, else returns 1. The following table shows how the digits are compared

Example

console.log(9 | 7) //15

00000000000000000000000000001001 =9
00000000000000000000000000000111 =7
-------------------------------------------------
00000000000000000000000000001111 =15
-------------------------------------------------
^
Bitwise XOR
The Bitwise XOR operator accepts two operands. It compares each binary digit of the left operand with the digit at the corresponding position in the right operand. If both the bits are different then it returns 1, else 0. The following table shows how the digits are compared

console.log(9 ^ 7) //14
9 | 7 = 14

00000000000000000000000000001001 =9
00000000000000000000000000000111 =7
-------------------------------------------------
00000000000000000000000000001110 =14
-------------------------------------------------
~
Bitwise NOT
Bitwise NOT ~ is a unary operator, hence takes only one operand. It just flips the binary digits from 1 to 0 & 0 to 1.

Example

~5 = 6
00000000000000000000000000000101 = 5
11111111111111111111111111111010 = -6
>>
Bitwise Right Shift
The Right Shift operator (>>) shifts the specified number of digits of the first operand to the right. The right operand specifies the number of digits to shift

Example
9
00000000000000000000000000001001 = 9
9 >> 1
00000000000000000000000000000100 = 4
<<
Bitwise Left Shift
The left Shift operator shift (<<) the specified number of digits of the first operand to the left. The right operand specifies the number of digits to shift

Example
9
00000000000000000000000000001001 = 9
9 << 1
00000000000000000000000000010010 = 18
>>>
Bitwise Right Shift with Zero
The Unsigned right Shift (also known as zero-fill right shift) operator (>>>) shift the specified number of digits of the first operand to the right. The right operand specifies the number of digits to shift

Example
9
00000000000000000000000000001001 = 9
9 >> 1
00000000000000000000000000000100 = 4

Assignment operators

NameSyntaxMeaning
Assignmentx = yx = y
Addition assignmentx += yx =x+ y
Subtraction assignmentx -= yx = x - y
Multiplication assignmentx *= yx = x * y
Division assignmentx /= yx = x / y
Remainder assignmentx %= yx = x % y
Exponentiation assignmentx **= yx = x ** y
Left shift assignmentx <<= yx = x << y
Right shift assignmentx >>= yx = x >> y
Unsigned right shift assignmentx >>>= yx = x >>> y
Bitwise AND assignmentx &= yx = x & y
Bitwise XOR assignmentx ^= yx = x ^ y
Bitwise OR assignmentx |= yx = x | y
Logical AND assignmentx &&= yx && (x = y)
Logical OR assignmentx ||= yx || (x = y)
Logical nullish assignmentx ??= yx ?? (x = y)

Miscellaneous Operators

Misc
Operators
Description & Examples
+
String Concatenation
The string concatenation operator (+) concatenates two string values and returns a new string

let a = "Hello "+ "World"
console.log(a) //Hello World
?
Conditional (ternary) operator
Syntax
condition ? expression1 : expression2;

If the condition is true, the operator has the value of val1. Otherwise, it has the value of val2. You can use the conditional operator anywhere you would use a standard operator.

Example

let isValid = true;
let message = isValid ? 'Valid' : 'Failed';
console.log(message) //'Valid
,
Comma operator
The comma operator separates each of its operands and evaluates all of them from left to right. It returns the value of the last operand.

Example

let x = 1;
let y = 10;
x = (x++, y++, x+y);
console.log(x) //13

Type Operators

Type
Operators
Description & Examples
inThe in operator returns true if the specified property is in the specified object.

Example

var mycar = { make: 'Honda', model: 'Accord', year: 1998 };
'make' in mycar; // returns true
'model' in mycar; // returns true
deleteThe delete operator deletes an object's property.

Examples

var myobj = {h: 4}; // create object with property h
delete myobj.h; // returns true (can delete user-defined properties)

typeof
The typeof operator returns a string indicating the type of the unevaluated operand

Example

console.log(typeof 1337) // number
console.log(typeof "foo") // string
console.log(typeof true) // boolean
console.log(typeof Math.round) // function
console.log(typeof undefined) // undefined
console.log(typeof null) // object
instanceofThe instanceof operator returns true if the specified object is of the specified object type.

Example

class Person {
name: string = '';
}
let person = new Person();

console.log(person instanceof Person ); // true
console.log(person instanceof Object ); // true

Operator Precedence

The operator precedence along with their associativity determines how Typescript evaluates an expression when there are multiple operators present in the expression. Each Typescript operators have certain precedence. The Typescript evaluates the operators with higher precedence first. If a group of operators has the same Precedence, then it evaluates them either left to right or right to left, depending on the operator’s associativity.

Click to read more about Operator Precedence

Reference

  1. Expressions & Operators
  2. Precedence & Associativity

Read More

  1. Complete Typescript Tutorial
  2. Typescript Operators
  3. Arithmetic Operators
  4. Unary plus / Unary minus Operators
  5. Increment/Decrement Operators
  6. Comparison / Relational Operators
  7. Equality Operator / Strict Equality Operators
  8. Ternary Conditional Operators
  9. Logical Operators
  10. Bitwise Operators
  11. Assignment Operators
  12. Nullish coalescing operator
  13. Comma Operator in Typescript
  14. Operator Precedence

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